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Topic: Chicano Art
Replies: 23   Pages: 2   Last Post: Oct 7, 2005 10:25 PM by: Jimmy longoria

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James Michael Lawrence

Posts: 134
Registered: Jan 3, 2004
Re: Chicano Art
Posted: Sep 3, 2005 12:43 PM
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Ray Rolfe

Posts: 3,263
From: Northeast Minneapolis
Registered: Sep 5, 2001
Re: Chicano Art
Posted: Sep 3, 2005 6:57 PM
  Reply

> I'm waiting until examples from these exhibitions are
> available on-line. I have no opinion about the
> exhibitions and remain undecided about what the
> curators/critics/whomever have said here. I was
> interested in what you would have to say upon reading
> the review. Thanks. What I am wondering about - and
> I'm sure others are - even yourself (?) - is how your
> posts are beginning to show up with Ray Rolfe stated
> as the author? Colin? Webmaster? Anyone have a
> clue as to the 'why' of this? Thanks - JML

Perhaps, James, what you do not understand is that the Coyote is magic. Jimmy Longoria is an artist - the Chicano artist de Minnesota. The Coyote will respond to the article you have e-mailed to Longoria off the forum. But it is important that this performance continue to defy what Anglo artists want to say about non-Anglo artists. There is a need for you to suspend your normal logic to understand a culture that does not submit to yours. If you think this out, it is the freedom that will be shared with you, as an artist, that will allow you to escape the tragic situation of Anglo art.
Coyote through Ray

James Michael Lawrence

Posts: 134
Registered: Jan 3, 2004
Re: Chicano Art
Posted: Sep 3, 2005 9:26 PM
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jaime longoria

Posts: 1,161
Registered: Oct 7, 2002
Re: Chicano Art
Posted: Sep 4, 2005 10:20 AM
  Reply

> Don't talk down to me, Jaime - My collective life
> experience guarantees my ability to comprehend many
> cultural differences - regardless of your believing
> that or not. You are not that difficult to
> understand nor comprehend...and accusing others of
> racism is pretty gutless when your own racism is
> obvious. You wear your racial and cultural origins
> like a drag queen wears his same old rags. It would
> be nice to be able to relate to you without you
> constantly throwing your race card at others. AND
> NOW! That anger spent uselessly on you...here's a
> suggestion that at least I intend to follow: Why
> don't you and I both shut our fucking traps, keep our
> fingers off the keyboards, not log on here for
> awhile, and concentrate on how we - as individuals -
> NOT AS OUR ON-LINE PERSONAS - try to find some way we
> can help the victims of Hurrican Katrina. In the
> face of their immediate need...I am sickened by you
> and I paying more attention to this today rather than
> to them. I'm over and out. JML

I am not talking down to you, James. You called me out with your post of that article. You also sent the article to my personal e-mail. You honor me, by taking me seriously enough to be concerned about Latino art in New York City. Jimmy Longoria, Chicano Artist de Minnesota, at the inception of identifying himself as an artist, gave in to the reality of indigenous art. My mentor, Yando Rios, whose mother said the name was a joke on her sons future, Wandering Rivers, insisted, in 1974, that I retreat within myself to find my spirit before I started my journey to identify myself as a Chicano muralist. At the time I thought it silly. I must admit that I was truly Western in thinking and believed it absurd nonsense to search for a spirit identity. I went to Yando and gave him a fabricated idea. Some nonsense that I made up about going into the mountains and fasting, staying awake all night long watching the stars morph and hearing the stars sing, the trees talk, having a mystical experience. He laughed at me. He said that it was a nice story, but that it was not the way it happens. He sent me out to the backyard of his house in Placentia, CA to talk with his mother. She was sitting on a stool holding a chicken on her lap, quietly soothing the chicken by stroking its neck. She was wearing a god-awful polyester lime green leisure suit, with her black and white hair braided and tied off with a red and white ribbon. She was wearing Dorothy Lamour sunglasses and she said, "Why did he send you out here?" I said I didn't know. She laughed and - in one swift movement - broke the neck of the chicken. She held on to the body until the chicken carcass stopped moving. Then she said, "What are the real answers to the questions my son asked you?" I found myself answering uncousciously. I said to her that my color was iridescent black. That my item was a black feather, like that of a crow, and that the only sound that I could remember was the howl of a coyote. She asked me where I was in my head, and I said it was inside a museum. She asked me to peel the skin off the chicken with the feathers on. She showed me how to insert my fingers where she had twisted off the neck. And she showed me how to pull back the skin and feathers like a pelt. The entire chicken became naked in my hands with virtually no blood and the only thing we had to cut were the ends of the wings and the feet. She then wadded up newspaper and put it inside the skin and put it underneath her seat. I held the warm chicken in my hands and she said that I needed to massage the breast because this was a rooster and that we had killed the angry male spirit in my heart and she had a name for me. That name, James, is El Perdido. It means the lost one. She then told me that no matter what I was going to do, I would wind up lost. She said as soon as I accepted being lost, I would find myself. Yando came out and invited me back in the house and out to his garage studio. He said that from that moment on I was his spirit son, but more importantly, I was his mother's grandson. He asked me my name. I told him and he laughed uncontrollably. I asked what was so funny. He said his mother never would give names to people seeking a way, and the kiling of the rooster was about taking away my ego. He said for an artist to not have the ego of being the source of truth is to be lost in America. That I would be so odd an artist in the American art community that I would constantly be like a wandering river taking the wrong turn. That was in 1974. I was a very rational human being. I thought everything I was exposed to was nonsense. But my life journey from that moment has been a series of wrong turns. My home at the furthest extent of the United States in South Texas is bracketed by two important rivers, the Rio Grande, formerly known as the Rio Bravo, and the Mississippi. It is, for me, very poetic that you should mention the Mississippi disaster in the same bracket of thought of your fear of Coyote. Understand, James, Coyote is a spiritual aspect of art. You will note that I am back in my own signature and voice. Ray must have taken my socks off. Understand what that means. There is a rational explanation for my signing on here through Ray's identity. But for my grandmother's sake, there is no rationality to it except that it is cosmic. You are right, we do need to figure out what to do about the disaster in the South. Certainly, art groups will organize another art auction, and you and I will both participate. I would put this to you, James, join me and invite everyone who has posted here to go to Colin and ask the staff of the Walker to host the mnartists.org forum artists auction to raise money to support relief efforts.

On the matter of the article that you sent via my personal e-mail. I can only comment on the article as I have not seen the show. But I will tell you what Coyote says, the desire of art critics and art professionals to dismiss Latino/Hispanic/Chicano art as just another fashion or fad of the New York art scene is a tragic example of the same kind of Minnesota Nice racism that I am fighting. Remember this, James, my birth certificate officially identifies me as a White person. My grandfathers are likewise identified as white people, as are my grandmothers. It is not an oversight of the documentarians of the time because we find Mexican as a race of that time in the same records. The race card that you and others claim I am playing that you and others keep reminding me of, is not what you think it is. It is the race of people who are true to themselves. I think that is what irritates you and Fallon and others. I am a white man who is truly making himself not white. And that is very challenging to all those artists in New York who are trying to make art that white people accept and then appending Latino/Hispanic/Chicano to their names because they believe, as you do, that it is the trend or fashion of the time. Please understand, James, I am the only Chicano artist in Minnesota because I am the only one here willing to openly identify myself as a Chicano artist. And through rational examination of budgets, James, I can make the claim that Chicano art is being discriminated against by the art funding community. The rational reality speaks for itself, James. But my approach is a spiritual one. Do the art institutions have it within their spirit to solve the rational problem of discrimination against Chicano art? It is a scary proposition, James, because there are over 60,000 Hmong here. Hispanics keep growing by the hundreds per day. African-Americans from the disaster site will be coming here - 3,000 according to the papers. The cultural diversity of Minnesota will explode in the next 20 years, James. The lost one does not champion the cause of himself as much as you all would like it to be that way. The truth is, Coyote is part of the waking up of your spiritual conscience. Mysole purpose, James, is to allow you to vent your deep seated anger and rage so that i can invite you to walk with me in peacefully changing the structure of Minnesota Nice racism. That is the jewel - and a hint here, James - indigenous people rarely polished jewels. They knew the strength of the stone in its natural form. There are some of my brothers that do not study history, do not tap into their culture. They unfortunately make themsleves cigar store Indians.

With much affection and respect, James,
Coyote
New York bound

You are not that difficult to
> understand nor comprehend...and accusing others of
> racism is pretty gutless when your own racism is
> obvious. You wear your racial and cultural origins
> like a drag queen wears his same old rags. It would
> be nice to be able to relate to you without you
> constantly throwing your race card at others. AND

James Michael Lawrence

Posts: 134
Registered: Jan 3, 2004
Re: Chicano Art
Posted: Sep 4, 2005 11:07 AM
  Reply

edit

jaime longoria

Posts: 1,161
Registered: Oct 7, 2002
Re: Chicano Art
Posted: Sep 4, 2005 11:35 AM
  Reply

> I love you, my friend. You are so amazing. Just
> when I think you've become mired in something that I
> feel (and it's only my feelings, which admittedly may
> be incorrect or just plain pig-headed emotionalism)
> serves you or Minnesota artists or the human race,
> for that matter - You pull a spectacular rabbit out
> of your hat. Saying so is not my being sarcastic or
> reducing your doing so to a level of less importance.
> Your reply here proves to me exactly what I've been
> telling myself all along. And that is you have so
> much of the 'good stuff' within your being...that
> it's well-worth, even imperative, that the irritated
> frustration I feel over most of your 'performances'
> here has to be considered as part of the price of
> admission to that which is product of that 'good
> stuff'. (And when I talk about the 'good stuff' I
> am not projecting an Anglo estimation of what's good
> and what's not...I use those words because I simply
> cannot come up with others that work to express what
> I'm trying to get at...it's more like possessing a
> link to the 'universal goods'.) My angry post last
> night wouldn't have seen the light of day if the
> server at mnartists.org hadn't gone on the blink
> soon after I posted it. Actually, I was up several
> times during the early morning to see if I could log
> back on and delete/modify it.
> Just now when I found your reply...my first reaction
> was to ignore it and try to deny/disown my own
> words...but then, my partner suggested that the
> exchange is a blessing...in that, here I have the
> opportunity to learn more about you...and while doing
> so...more about myself. So...let me go for now...I
> will get back to you after I have digested all of
> what you've offered me. As for doing an
> auction...certainly I would contribute to that...but
> I will be gone soon for most of a month...and wonder
> how I could participate while I'm out of the country.
> In the meantime - Peter and I have already donated
> money, and will be giving blood ASAP - we remain
> open and alert to emerging opportinities to
> contribute what we can. Take good care today, Jaime
> - Have a safe journey. JML

Are you and your partner going to Japan? If you are - wherever you are - please observe mass transit. Take notes, take pictures, explore connections, build a network Minnesota to japan. My wandering way is going to take me to Nagasaki. The magic you saw happens every time I work with kids. Their pure energy opens up things and changes things so that I can not go in the direction I thought I was going, but have to redirect myself in that way. In the effort to help young women prove themselves I find myself working with Hmong students to make an ambitious "art project." What is fascinating about this art project is that it involves no art funding. This may explain my harsh tone towards all those artists complaining about funding. What I have found is that by abandoning my demand for compensation as an artist, a new/old way of doing art projects has materialized in my hands. I have tried to bring in other individual artists into this process, but tragically they are still caught up in the funding lottery game. Doug Padilla made a point to me and that is that nothing ever happened for him until he left the country. I thought that Coyote Infinity had successfully left Minnesota because of lurkers who follow my posts. But, the physicality of the artist seems to be more significant than our technology would lead us to expect.

So, while you are gone, please do try to stay connected here. Remember, Fallon is not here physically, but he finds a way to do his dance with the Coyote. Please be my agent in art circles and advance the idea that in Minnesota there is a Chicano artist who has invented a new art form. I think you will find some incredible rewards for yourself both spiritually and professionally if you do this.

Have a safe journey,
Coyote A

Ray Rolfe

Posts: 3,263
From: Northeast Minneapolis
Registered: Sep 5, 2001
Re: Chicano Art
Posted: Sep 4, 2005 9:46 PM
  Reply

Please clearly discribe your new art form.

Bob Schulz

Posts: 416
From: Brooklyn Park, MN
Registered: Aug 15, 2003
Re: Chicano Art
Posted: Sep 5, 2005 12:44 AM
  Reply

I'll be leaving in the morning for McDonald's for a nice scrambled egg and muffin entree with coffee. For a mere $2.84 I also receive a Strib and a refill. And, as for the real benefit, I'm served by people from foreign countries whom I cannot understand. It's like traveling the world while not going anywhere. Living in NYC for nine years in the sixties and seventies was less confusing, except for Zum-Zum where all the waitresses spoke only German; frank, frank, mit kraut! I once inadvertently left a penny on the counter, and the waitress threw it at me. Tough city. After walking outside, in my confusion, I stepped off a curb and a cab drove over my foot. The guy next to me yelled, "Stay on the curb until the light changes!" Tough city.

We indeed are the world, much to the chagrin of the multi-culty freaks. And except for two people in Poland, everyone is trying to get in. Not to become a purportedly hated American, but to send money home. Hated but treated as a golden goose, what a country. A few more natural disasters, a couple more terrorist attacks and the American haters will finally experience their much anticipated wet dream, the collapse of our Republic.

Jimmy longoria

Posts: 112
From: Minnesota
Registered: Oct 6, 2005
Re: Chicano Art
Posted: Oct 7, 2005 10:25 PM
  Reply

> I'll be leaving in the morning for McDonald's for a
> nice scrambled egg and muffin entree with coffee.
> For a mere $2.84 I also receive a Strib and a
> refill. And, as for the real benefit, I'm served by
> people from foreign countries whom I cannot
> understand. It's like traveling the world while not
> going anywhere. Living in NYC for nine years in the
> sixties and seventies was less confusing, except for
> Zum-Zum where all the waitresses spoke only German;
> frank, frank, mit kraut! I once inadvertently left
> a penny on the counter, and the waitress threw it at
> me. Tough city. After walking outside, in my
> confusion, I stepped off a curb and a cab drove over
> my foot. The guy next to me yelled, "Stay on the
> curb until the light changes!" Tough city.
>
> We indeed are the world, much to the chagrin of the
> multi-culty freaks. And except for two people in
> Poland, everyone is trying to get in. Not to become
> a purportedly hated American, but to send money home.
> Hated but treated as a golden goose, what a country.
> A few more natural disasters, a couple more
> e terrorist attacks and the American haters will
> finally experience their much anticipated wet dream,
> the collapse of our Republic.
I have not been to New York. I have heard that things are better since the 9/11, they seem to have found that they need each other after all. I guess you could thank the Terrorists for bringing our country together!! Strang how out side threats bring our country together- we might just keep this World War with outsiders going if it leads to brotherly love in the "tough" city.

Hey Bob, how come so many hispanics get metals of honor than the per centage they are of the population?

Hey Bob, your friend Morgan ever look up Felix Longoria? Neat piece of history???

Have you noticed how many of the women store ads have a healthy tan? What is going on here? Have you read the business projections on retail for Xmas? There is real fear that the "brown demographic" may stay away from the stores- it spells doom for the retail- and then new oders for next year and the start of a domino effect( and it has noting to do with socialism---imagine our free market economy brought down by "brown teens not spending thier $1,670.00 per year in the malls?????

much love my brother
Coyote in the Stock Market

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