mnartists.org

Home » Forum Home » Past Features » Legal Live

Topic: Legal Live
Replies: 109   Pages: 8   Last Post: Aug 11, 2005 3:09 PM by: jaime longoria

Reply to this Topic
Search Forum

Back to Topic List
Replies: 109   Pages: 8   [ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Next ]
Colin Rusch

Posts: 1,435
Registered: Oct 16, 2002
Legal Live
Posted: Feb 24, 2005 7:27 PM
  Reply

Join a panel of legal experts talking about the topics of Intellectual Property, the Arts, the Internet, and the places where these intersect, i.e. copyrights, contracts, licensing, partial use, etc. Its a brave new world and you should know about your rights and obligations as you make the most of it. Thursday March 3, 6:30-8:30.


Ray Rolfe

Posts: 3,263
From: Northeast Minneapolis
Registered: Sep 5, 2001
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Feb 24, 2005 9:10 PM
  Reply

This is going to be excellent!

Kathleen Kvern

Posts: 38
Registered: Jul 8, 2004
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 1, 2005 12:22 PM
  Reply

Thank you to our guests logging on to talk about legal issues relating to the arts. Here is some background information on each of our panelists.

Glenn Otis Brown has been Executive Director of Creative Commons since Summer 2002. Before that, he served as Assistant Director. Glenn is also a lecturer at Stanford Law School, where he teaches a class on Creative Commons and free and open-source software licensing with Lawrence Lessig. Glenn graduated from the University of Texas at Austin (B.A. 1996, summa) and Harvard Law School (JD, 2000, magna). At Harvard, Glenn was a member of the Harvard Law Review and worked at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, where he organized Signal or Noise?, a digital music conference and concert, in cooperation with the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Jon M.Garon, Dean of Hamline University School of Law, is a nationally recognized instructor and authority on intellectual property, particularly copyright, entertainment and media law. He has written "THE INDEPENDENT FILMMAKER'S LAW & BUSINESS GUIDE TO FINANCING, SHOOTING, AND DISTRIBUTING INDEPENDENT AND DIGITAL FILMS" (2002) and "ENTERTAINMENT LAW & PRACTICE" (2004) and co-authored "THEATER LAW: CASES AND MATERIALS" (2004).

Walter G. Lehmann is the managing partner of LEHMANN STROBEL PLC. Walt practices in the areas of art and entertainment, intellectual and real property law, with a focus on helping individuals, businesses and organizations manage their real and intellectual property assets. His clients include independent film, television, radio and multimedia producers, directors, screenwriters, musicians, production companies, recording studios, photographers, visual artists, museums, galleries, and other art-related non-profit organizations.

Mary Madden is a research specialist at the Pew Internet and American Life Project, a nonprofit, nonpartisan research initiative funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts that studies the social impact of the internet on American’s lives. She has co-authored several reports about music and the internet, and is the Project’s lead researcher on an artist-focused study that examines artists’ use of the internet and their attitudes towards copyright issues online.

Gregg S. Reed

Posts: 10
Registered: Jan 13, 2005
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 1, 2005 8:28 PM
  Reply

I have a question for the panel that I'm posting early. I have a web site with a media player at http://www.interscienceproductions.com I'm using a corporate image web license from BMI to play music by the Beatles and other groups related to them. How well accepted are web performance licenses from performing rights groups such as BMI and ASCAP?

Kathleen Kvern

Posts: 38
Registered: Jul 8, 2004
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 3, 2005 12:30 PM
  Reply

Also some helpful links to some of our panelists sites and resources.

Creative Commons
http://www.creativecommons.org

Pew Internet and American Life Project
http://www.pewinternet.org

Music and the Internet Report by Mary Madden
http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/142/report_display.asp

Lehmann Strobel PLC law firm
http://www.lehmannstrobel.com

Jon Garon publications (link to Barnes & Noble...and I'm sure Jon can suggest other places to pick up his books)
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/results.asp?WRD=jon%20garon&userid=iM4uNJpAi8&cds2Pid=94

Ray Rolfe

Posts: 3,263
From: Northeast Minneapolis
Registered: Sep 5, 2001
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 3, 2005 4:03 PM
  Reply

Don't forget about the very wonderfull "Future of Music Coalition"
http://www.futureofmusic.org/index.cfm .

Jon Garon

Posts: 23
From: Hamline University School of Law
Registered: Feb 24, 2005
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 3, 2005 6:14 PM
  Reply

I think the U.S. Copyright Office provides a wealth of information at http://www.copyright.gov/

For those interested in the Grokster debate, the Office maintains a complete listing of the briefs being filed in the case at http://www.copyright.gov/docs/mgm/index.htm

Mary Madden

Posts: 11
From: Washington, D.C.
Registered: Feb 24, 2005
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 3, 2005 6:28 PM
  Reply

Thanks, Jon. You read my mind. I was also going to suggest that, if it interests others here tonight, it might be relevant to talk a little bit about the upcoming Supreme Court decision in the Grokster case, and how either outcome might affect some of the technology that artists use in their creative work. In addition to the U.S. Copyright Office page, there’s another helpful summary and set of links on the Public Knowledge website here:

http://www.publicknowledge.org/issues/grokster

See esp. this statement from the EFF brief:

“This case raises a question of critical importance at the border between copyright and innovation: when should the distributor of a multi-purpose tool be held liable for the infringements that may be committed by end-users of the tool?”

Colin Rusch

Posts: 1,435
Registered: Oct 16, 2002
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 3, 2005 6:29 PM
  Reply

Hi Everyone,

Its 6:30. I want to make a couple of notes before we start. First, thank you to all of the guests tonight. Second, please don't be shy in asking questions or participating in the forum. We usually have a number of people watching the forums and a handful posting. We'd love to hear from everyone. And last, during the Art of Technology forum we had a large crowd and the forum software crash with everyone trying to reload the forum page. If this happens again, please be patient, the server will reboot automatically. Just check in after 5 to 10 minutes. It probably will not take that long.


Colin

Colin Rusch

Posts: 1,435
Registered: Oct 16, 2002
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 3, 2005 6:32 PM
  Reply

I would love to hear your thoughts on the Grokster case.

Jon Garon

Posts: 23
From: Hamline University School of Law
Registered: Feb 24, 2005
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 3, 2005 6:32 PM
  Reply

Last Friday, Prof. Niels Schauman and I roll-played the oral argument at a program for the Minnesota IP bar. It was a very interesting debate. (In the interest of full disclosure, I represented the entertainment industry while Niels represented the technology industry.) He raised the concerns that I expect the panelists here would raise about the relationship of technology to downstream infringers.

LEHMANN STROBEL PLC

Posts: 22
Registered: Feb 24, 2005
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 3, 2005 6:35 PM
  Reply

Hello this is Walt Lehmann

Glenn Otis Brown

Posts: 3
Registered: Feb 24, 2005
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 3, 2005 6:38 PM
  Reply

Hi, there, everyone. This is Glenn from Creative Commons, <http://creativecommons.org>. Thanks.

Jon Garon

Posts: 23
From: Hamline University School of Law
Registered: Feb 24, 2005
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 3, 2005 6:39 PM
  Reply

Based on the briefs and our Mock Oral Argument, the case is very simple and very obvious - depending on where you start your analysis. I agree with the entertainment industries that when 90% of the use is for infringement, then those profiting from commercial exploitation of the technology cannot be immune from its misuse. Just as Kinko's has some obligation to police the use of its copying projects, Peer-to-peer companies have an obligation to retain sufficient control to police rampant abuse.

From the technology perspective, there is a concern that this is an attempt to stifle developing technology that will eventually prove commerically viable (and other peer-to-peer products already are). It may be an attempt to control the new technology in a manner inconsistent with both copyright and antitrust law. Finally, the Court should not be the place to balance these economic concerns, but rather the Congress is better suited to that task.

In their own ways, both arguments are probably true. I fear the damage to film, publishing, and music (to a lesser degree), so I err on the side of protecting the artist until the safeguards are in place.

jon

Hathaway

Posts: 8
Registered: Mar 3, 2005
Re: Legal Live
Posted: Mar 3, 2005 6:42 PM
  Reply

I am new this on-line thing, but thank you all for sharing your expertise with the arts community.

I am a 3-D visual artist, and I have been reluctant to post my work on the web for fear that it will be appropriated. Can I know for sure that it is protected out in the big wide world?

Replies: 109   Pages: 8   [ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Next ]
Back to Topic List